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What Can You Do With An English Degree? At WCU 2018

What Can You Do With An English Degree? At WCU 2018

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

So happy that all of you are here with What Can You Do With an English Degree or as I also say at times, what can’t you do with this English degree, because you will find that there’s such a wide array of opportunities. What I’m … I’m going to thank first of all are two sponsors, co-sponsors along with the English department, The [inaudible 00:00:28] Career Center and Kate Shellaway. Kate if you want to come up in a minute and just to say a few words. I’m going to introduce each speaker one by one, and they’re going to tell us a little bit about their English degree, how it has helped them where they are today and what they do, any advice. They’re just going to give the stories about what happened to them after West Chester.
Then we’ll go into Q&A and then we’ll have opportunity for speed networking. There’s coffee and tea and there should be a plenty of … Are there cookies back there? Yes, good. There should be plenty cookies guys and help yourself to that. And so we might as well get started. Oh I didn’t tell you who … I’m Dr Eleanor Shevlin. I’m in English. I’ve done this since2002. If you’re not sure about what to do with your degree or your [inaudible 00:01:32], and if you want to do something else, you really should talk to faculty and feel free to come talk to me. I worked for 11 years before coming back and getting a masters and a doctorate.
So I actually have had quite a bit of experience and it’s one of the reasons, I run this because I realized by being out over those 11 years how my degree has really helped me. So [inaudible 00:02:00].

Kate Shellaway

Thank you. Hey everyone. My name is Kate Shellaway. I am the assistant director for the career development center. I will echo Dr [inaudible 00:02:09] remarks. Awesome to see such a great crowd whether or not you feel like it, just being here today is a really nice step in your career development path, whatever that might be. Let me ask you, has anyone visited the career development center? Yay, awesome. I’m happy with that number. For those of you who don’t know, the career development center which is located over in Lawrence, second floor,225. We are here to help students with selecting a major, if you are happy in your major deciding what you can do with it.

You’re going to learn about some really great paths just today, or we can continue that conversation of how do I explore and engage in my major, and how can those things really help set you up for after graduation, to make sure that you’re in that job and you’re starting that career path off in the right place. Briefly what my office is really known for if I ask probably a number of you to raise your hands, on things like resume reviews, cover letter reviews, mock interview practice, job and internship search, strategies, a job board and of all those things that many of you in the room might be starting to think about a little bit more. That’s just kind of a quick commercial about what career development can do.

So for those who have yet to come in contact with our office, I really encourage you to stop by. We have open hours every day one to three. No appointment needed, just come on in. One of us counselors on duty will help you out with whatever you want to talk about, or you’re more than welcome to schedule an appointment as well. Just so I know a little bit more about the room, any first year students in the room? Any sophomores? Good. Juniors? Can I see if we have any seniors? All right, well first off congratulations seniors. I know it might not be [inaudible 00:03:54]. Regardless of where you are because you really have that full scope here, it’s never too early to be thinking about this which is again so great that you’re here.

I encourage you to say whatever the next step is after today’s event, figure that out and let our office, let your great faculty help you engage in the elements of the career develop process that you’re on, okay? Since we have more seniors in the room, if you haven’t heard about it yet, our office in conjunction with student leadership and involvement has a whole bunch of events, all throughout these first weeks of April, financial wellness, our etiquette dinner that’s next week, how to negotiate offers, things like we’re going to have a car jacked up on the site parking lot, and how to care for your car just like adopting one on one stuff along with financial and career wellness things, so keep your eye out for that as well.

And I’ll be here till the end of the panel, so you can sneak back and talk to me if you have any questions, but if not I’m going to turn it back over, to hear about all the great things [inaudible 00:04:55].

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

Our first speaker, we’re going to go down in order is Coleen Collins. She is a marketing associate at [inaudible 00:05:07], at Taylor and Francis. And if you know who Taylor Francis is, please look at the back of some of your textbooks. They are one of the largest international publishers based out of London and they do a whole variety of things. We have a number of our [inaudible 00:05:28] who love West Chester students. So go ahead Coleen.

Coleen Collins

Sure. [inaudible 00:05:33] team. It’s only been two years since I started at Taylor and Francis, but I think that degree and what I had done at West Chester really helped [inaudible 00:05:48] in order. So while I was at West Chester, in addition to the academics I chose a minor in graphic design and journalism. I had an idea that I wanted to go into publishing, while I did not know into what [inaudible 00:06:00], to complement the degree. I got myself into the programs that were offered here at West Chester, so I don’t know … I have seen a lot maybe the English club, so I started working on [inaudible 00:06:16],and created that two years in a row.

Also [inaudible 00:06:22] myself into the newspaper, just to be [inaudible 00:06:24] in a couple of different capacities, and I think there I decided as well this is the thing I’d like to do. I did an internship in my last year at [inaudible 00:06:37] Magazine. I worked in a very small office and saw how a magazine goes from start to finish, more on a quarterly basis. I graduated December 2013, and I was hired as a marketing assistant in 2016 at Taylor and Francis in Philadelphia. So there I [inaudible 00:06:55] of an academic publisher, so I was an assistant [inaudible 00:06:59] arts and humanities portfolio, which I was lucky because in that I was able to work with academics, with professors and still carry on the [inaudible 00:07:12], and so I just jumped into that.

I was assistant project design in our campaign. [inaudible 00:07:20] conferences to show, to get [inaudible 00:07:23] so authors or people who are journalists, or [inaudible 00:07:34]. So kind of [inaudible 00:07:38] and then April, 2017 I was promoted to marketing associate, so I directly now manage a series of our humanities portfolios, and as well [inaudible 00:07:48] contacts with the editorial board [inaudible 00:07:52. So one of the perks with this is the conference job, so I get to travel [inaudible 00:08:11]. I go to [inaudible 00:08:13] at least once a month, so I attend these conferences and then [inaudible 00:08:16].

The industry [inaudible 00:08:19] what I was interested in, so graphic design, journalism [inaudible 00:08:23] and craft what I wanted to do [inaudible 00:08:27] college, and apply it even in my interview. I took all that with me and I think the work at West Chester really [inaudible 00:08:34], and helped me in that interview process. In experience generally I would say it’s been pretty confident in how [inaudible 00:08:42].

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

Our next speaker is Chris [inaudible 00:08:58] and he is CEO and entrepreneur of [inaudible 00:09:02].

Chris Dima

Hello everybody. I didn’t know I was going to be here until yesterday. Last year I was supposed to be here but didn’t really show up. [inaudible 00:09:14].What I also didn’t know but I knew my niece was coming to walk through the editorial questions this morning, with my brother and her two sisters. What I found out at lunch was that she was interested in pursuing an English degree, because 20 years ago when I told my brother I was going to not to do biology but to do English, he thought I was [inaudible 00:09:47], which [inaudible 00:09:51]. So it’s an interesting day because at lunch I had to come up with [inaudible 00:09:59, of ways to describe the important values of English major.

At first I said something about communication and then I think [inaudible 00:10:09], understanding how to argue with people, and then I just extrapolated a little more that has found building arguments for everything, including what you want out of life and structured thought. And if you’re an English major you probably talk to a lot of people you’re like, “How does a person [inaudible 00:10:29]?” That’s how the realization has inflated part of my career and where I’ve gone, which has gone a lot more different places. I [inaudible 00:10:52]. I did WCUR when it was just [inaudible 00:10:57], and we were certain that it wasn’t even plugged in.

But it looked like [inaudible 00:11:03], but it needs to be adapted. But after we got anything like this, and I had a party at my house I did five years ago, I did five years like [inaudible 00:11:19]. So after [inaudible 00:11:32]. So I went to Europe and tried to teach English, then I did for a little while and I came back, and [inaudible 00:11:48] teacher in the sociology department, [inaudible 00:11:52] in Venezuela and went with my girlfriend [inaudible 00:11:56]. Came back and actually became a English teacher sin ESL, head start [inaudible 00:12:06]. That was an awesome experience. And I also did adult education teaching in ESL, without any training in a … What’s it called?

It’s called [inaudible 00:12:23], not a church but a catholic church in [inaudible 00:12:27]. I did a [inaudible 00:12:36] where I went into the shacks, a number of houses [inaudible 00:12:41]. Then I went to … I was in [inaudible 00:13:03] they asked me to take pictures. I said yes and then [inaudible 00:13:12], so I pushed my way into that. And then I got accepted to an ESL masters program in a college in New Jersey, which was trying, and I was doing [inaudible 00:13:27]. After that I needed to find a job and I finished up some courses, and I got a job teaching [inaudible 00:13:37] in West Philadelphia. And I got that job because there were people in that class of 15, and they had quit school because there was too much mayhem in school.

I had 60 year old women [inaudible 00:13:50] worked in a factory for 30 years and they got laid off. I taught them [inaudible 00:13:56, I don’t know if you know that book, but we did crazy stuff that no one [inaudible 00:14:04] was teaching in high school, but there were no rules so I just made them up. And then I started thinking and seeing that I’m going to have to teach, I need more money so I thought of technology. I took some classes at [inaudible 00:14:19] in web design, and then I really … Then I moved into West Chester, found my first house and was like, “I can’t [inaudible 00:14:27].”

That’s how my wife [inaudible 00:14:29] mind, “I am quoting and I am going to look for a job that I can like to do.” I got a job in [inaudible 00:14:38]. There were no [inaudible 00:14:44], so I walked in and [inaudible 00:14:51] you have to do webs design I was like, “Not really [inaudible 00:14:52]. And he said, “You have to do it.” So instead he used there, I got them to ship me to California and work on software and then software business but I [inaudible 00:15:03], so I convinced them to [inaudible 00:15:06] come back and work with them in California, but I had no [inaudible 00:15:10] to be back so I could see my family.

So then I realized [inaudible 00:15:16] to do my own thing, and then I quit [inaudible 00:15:21] doing, building companies, more in products see where they’d go. First one I got into acquisition [inaudible 00:15:30]. They were like, “This we’re going to create this ourselves. We’re happy that [inaudible 00:15:36].” But they told me that there’s a good opportunity in the space to be an entrepreneur. And entrepreneurs understand things and trends, all you need to do is [inaudible 00:15:51, what’s going to happen, what could happen. I think in the end I started to make English, being an English [inaudible 00:16:08]. That’s really, really a [inaudible 00:16:17] and then you start to see how things impact each other, and that’s a leadership role in a company, how [macro 00:16:25] things interact?

That’s not a software engineer who is tactical or an HR person that’s tactical. So I think [inaudible 00:16:36] you start recognizing in yourself that you see bigger things that other people see, and you just have to be patient until you get the child’s credibility and be able to say, “I want to [inaudible 00:16:47].” And probably [inaudible 00:16:58] … If I could divide all majors into two groups, there would be the ones that are tactical like nursing or stuff that is really trained to go with the space, biology. Then there is the other group that helps you think more broadly with no specific career path, just straight honesty. You get something a little bit here and you give up something.
And over here, you get something [inaudible 00:17:31], maybe you’re not going to be able to bounce ground into the future, because you’re going to work 15 years and [inaudible 00:17:38].

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

…management. We do really well in management here that we see the bigger picture. [inaudible 00:18:02] the same majors that were in business school, but they come out and there end up being marketers and [inaudible 00:18:10]. Our next [inaudible 00:18:13] and she’s a estate attorney at Schneider, Nixon & John.

Speaker 5

So again [inaudible 00:18:25]. I am [inaudible 00:18:27] about being a lawyer, going to law school. [inaudible 00:18:36]. Thank you. I wanted to start by telling you that I actually love good ideas. And I’m going to tell you secondly that everyone got shocked when I told them that. It is one fathomable, for someone to love their career, to love what you do. What you need to do [inaudible 00:19:04], but figure out what it is that you enjoy doing. You spend most of your life at work, 50 years of your life at work. So you have to figure out what is it that you like to do and it can’t be … Don’t let your friends [inaudible 00:19:21]. It’s not about the money.

It’s not about the money. I should know first of all before I tell you I do not practice in Bigwell. Anyone know what Bigwell is? Bigwell firms in Center city like you sell your souls to. I kept mine, okay? That’s my purpose for you. The only time [inaudible 00:19:45] West Chester you had English and Philosophy, and knew coming into West Chester I would do English and then philosophy, which added [inaudible 00:19:53], that extra skill that you got from not having concrete major. But [inaudible 00:19:59] conference here in West Chester, where [inaudible 00:20:02] the one that Professor Summers already talked about books that were out of order, and the you realize they are actually in order just not the way I would have done it.

Professor [inaudible 00:20:14] from technology professor [inaudible 00:20:17]. I spent so much time [inaudible 00:20:32] and still couldn’t get an A, but what these classes had in common is that they were all super challenging. They challenged me. They were hard, had the same hard and they drove me … They forced me critical and analytical thinking. When we think about [inaudible 00:20:48], they research a lot. They develop those things, but it’s critical and analytical thinking that takes us from the English major to the lawyer. These professors pushed that. They pushed the envelope and took us into that [inaudible 00:21:05]. We all go [inaudible 00:21:07] my professors, take the hard questions, because…

I will tell you in law we can’t [inaudible 00:21:20] mediocre results so that’s why [inaudible 00:21:22]. Mediocre we’re not getting central results for clients. It’s important that you be able to take on charm, take it on head on and produce great results for your clients. An English major is taught to read between the lines. As a lawyer we have to listen not only to what our clients, but to everything they fail to mention. Those are important, the things that they forget to say. I’ve gone into law school of course and I graduated [inaudible 00:21:52]. So before [inaudible 00:21:58] that when I graduated West Chester, I was a little nervous about pursuing law school.

I had a hunch it is what I was going to do, but I foot the bill for my education. I’m sure some of you agree with that and you know the pain that comes with that, and a [inaudible 00:22:15] that I was going to do that. What I did, is went on to work in the mortgage industry and guess what I’m state attorney. We do a lot if real estate. It’s really just [inaudible 00:22:27] and here I am now. I think it’s important that you don’t worry so much about getting the right day after graduation, and [inaudible 00:22:38]. Just saying about law school, some of you may have heard it. The first year it is scarier, the second year they work you to death and the third year they bore you to death.

[inaudible 00:22:52]. The first year is completely draining. It’s competitive. You are with the top of the top, the best of the best and it’s competitive. There’s no way around it. I by nature I’m not a competitive person and that was the challenge for me. The other thing in law school is you have one exam … In almost all your classes at the end of the semester. We are used to … All English majors [inaudible 00:23:22] produce things that is very well crafted paper that we then hand in confidently. Not the case in most school. You just [inaudible 00:23:33], hand it in and [inaudible 00:23:36]. That’s the difference.

What I did gain however is that, to this day I make outlines before I write. I had that [inaudible 00:23:50], so we could outline to figure out what we were going to say very fast. My third year was my favorite. My third year was the year that I … I went to law school for the right reason. [inaudible 00:24:07] like a lot of other law schools. I’m sorry law connects, and all of them had law connects. During [inaudible 00:24:15] we actually got to serve as student lawyers under a supervising attorney, under [inaudible 00:24:21] firm in law school mostly provides services, to low income individuals, to the [inaudible 00:24:26]. But that’s the time that we met the clients, we directly [inaudible 00:24:33].

When you are in law school you are tailored to this legal brand, and then when you’re advocating for clients all of a sudden all this creative will come out and being an English major, because that’s what … You’re prepping something for your client that is more than just what’s the law, it’s how can I convince you with the law [inaudible 00:25:01]. You need to figure out [inaudible 00:25:04], but the next day you’re advocating the exact opposite for a different person. That’s the law. After law school you study for the Bar exam. That will be the worst [inaudible 00:25:14] of your life [inaudible 00:25:15]. I remember stopping while I was studying for the bar exam, and I ate dinner.

[inaudible 00:25:24], “I think I should.” Though the Bar exam was definitely worse, but I had a job lined up already. I was starting a job in September [inaudible 00:25:38] till October so I had to pass. I missed the [inaudible 00:25:43] for my first job. It was not for me. It was not a good fit and [inaudible 00:25:48]. Say no, you don’t have to keep the first job forever. Now I’m with Schneider, Nixon and John. [inaudible 00:25:56] and trust and estates, that’s the estate planning, estate administration, Medicaid and special needs planning, trust, anything that falls into where your assets are going to go. I’m the one who’s taking care of those things and I’ll go with [inaudible 00:26:11], dictating all of that.

For those of you interested in law which apparently is not [inaudible 00:26:20], I will tell you my [inaudible 00:26:22]. 7:30 I get into work, 7:50 [inaudible 00:26:26], eight o’clock attend to client matters, 8:15 the phone rings. 8:30 I resume the client matter, nine o’clock the phone rings. The next day attending that client matter. If you’re not flexible, this will not work out. Everyday going to work here’s my plan, here’s the plan so I would like to get through today. It’s sustaining. I love what I do because I touch a lot of people’s lives every day. I talk to 20 people in one day versus one. I like the law. Now I’m going to get to my advice piece.

What do I like about what I do? [inaudible 00:27:04] is small law. My client demographic is the middle, to upper middle class [inaudible 00:27:11] demographics in terms of age, but I’m the person they come to get their estate plan in order. I’m the person that they have an [inaudible 00:27:19] that they want in the will and we have to talk about it, where they’re afraid to disclose their financial position to their children, because they either because maybe they’ll abuse some [inaudible 00:27:30]. I’m also the person that they come to when they lose a loved one. When someone comes to me, I’m there to appropriate their business transaction. I am there in an extremely involved moment of someone’s life.

And they’re coming to me not just for legal advice but for compassion, kindness or comfort and just to guide them, in a way that they feel they can to a family member. That’s my role and I take it very seriously. My favorite moments in law in what I do, is where the client, when a client family member comes to me. Do you know why? Because when that client family member come to me, I will be part of their family. I can know they’ve put Joe in their document, I finally meet Joe. I know what he does. I can say next time I see them, “How is Joe. How is [inaudible 00:28:22]?” People love that and I love being on the other side of it. You become a family and it’s [inaudible 00:28:29].

You [inaudible 00:28:32] more important to you. [inaudible 00:28:36] this area of law to be quite [inaudible 00:28:39] personal personalities, and family dynamics. Every single moment you’re just [inaudible 00:28:46] different family dynamic and behind closed doors … We are behind closed doors when someone comes to us. So we see all personalities. [inaudible 00:29:00], I just want to tell you also about all the opportunities you have outside of your English major. You have so many [inaudible 00:29:09] and your career development [inaudible 00:29:13], don’t join everything. It’s far more important that what you join that you’re passionate about it.

What you actually do and what you’re actually passionate about will mean a lot more to you. Not your future employer, to you and your future employer in the future, but [inaudible 00:29:31]. By the time I graduated I was actively involved active in two. There was [inaudible 00:29:38] and [inaudible 00:29:40], the Jewish organization and a service fraternity. Now I’m out of law school and into practice, I’m [inaudible 00:29:48]. I teach Jewish education on the side and I’m in a service community, community service organization [inaudible 00:29:56]. My values are very focused what I wanted to do and I carried that off.

Figure out what you like and not just what looks good on paper, because when you go for that interview, [inaudible 00:30:10]. My [inaudible 00:30:13]. This is just an outline. Write down every contact information for everyone you meet, because everything [inaudible 00:30:19] if you decide to be a lawyer, if you decide to go into marketing, you decide to go into anything add all these people. Dr Shevlin probably knows thousands of people and that could be useful to you. Get her information before you graduate. And then my final note is just, choose the career path that you think will make you happy.

And for me it was law and this degree will get you there and just choose wisely. No one spends 40 hours a week at work anymore, and if you do we’re all jealous of you. Okay, choose wisely, choose something your passionate about and [inaudible 00:30:55]. Thank you.

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

Our final speaker is Christina [inaudible 00:31:07] International. She’s a pharmaceutical [inaudible 00:31:13].

Christina

Hey guys. I’m Christina. I graduated West Chester in 2013, so today it’s almost five years. I got into a different path. When I was in high school I knew I loved English, and I knew I wanted to help people and everyone said, “If you few major in English you’re going to go into insurance or sales, there’s no other option.” So I chose education, so I actually graduated from West Chester with a [inaudible 00:31:38]. I got a job right after graduating. I taught eighth grade English in Kensington for three years and decided that it really wasn’t for me. I didn’t love the politics behind education. I wasn’t passionate about children as I thought I was I actually really hate children, so I decided to make a career change and I went back to square one.

Three years out of college had no idea what I wanted to do. I thought, “Education is it. I’m going to be a teacher till retire.” So I regrouped I’m like, “I know I love English, I know I love helping people. What the heck I’m I going to do? I found this job as a recruiter. Does anyone even know what a recruiter does? Yeah, I didn’t either when I took that job. I was like, “This sounds interesting.” So basically what I do and what our company does, is we work with pharmaceutical companies and we work with biotech companies, all around the US. And whenever they have an open position, we will go out and find someone for them to hire for that position. So we’re helping candidates find jobs and we’re helping companies fill jobs.

That’s the [inaudible 00:32:45]. I really didn’t know I was going to be able to use my degree, and doubt I was going to be helping people. I just took the job because I need a job and it was interesting to me at the time. And I’ve been here almost two years, and it turns out that I use my degree every single day. Many of the physicians and the industries that you guys are going to go into, I think communication is the biggest thing and I think being an English major teaches you how to communicate, teaches you how to be direct and get your point across, and speak in an efficient way and write an email. You don’t even understand how important emails are in estate agent, fortunately it’s come to that but just being able to put your thoughts together and get your point across to someone, I have all got from being English major.

Secondly, I call all day on the phone. I call people. I ask them if they’re looking for a job. I call companies. I ask them if they have any open positions. And in order to do that I have to be a good communicator. I have to be efficient. Sometimes I’m talking to the president of a company or a CEO, and if I don’t know what I’m saying or I act like I don’t know what I’m saying, they won’t give me the time of day again going back to my degree. Lastly I have actually taken over the blog at my company, so I do everyone blogs. I write a lot of blog entries. I managed when the blogs come out. So I was able to take that track because of my passion for writing and my passion for English.

It turns out that I actually do use my degree a lot more than I was expecting, and like I said the other big thing for me was helping people. And it’s the best feeling in the world when you place someone who’s living paycheck to paycheck, or who is miserable in their job, doesn’t like what they’re doing or is living away from their family just so they can make ends meet. It’s a really rewarding opportunity to be able to do this every single day. Those two boxes were checked and when I first took the job, this kind of goes back to the sales thing. Is anyone in here thinking of going into sales just by a show of hands?

I was like, “I’m not doing sales. I don’t believe in shoving something down someone’s throat,” and there are so many ways that you can go into the sales profession and not be a salesman. So just think about that as you’re going out and you’re looking for job opportunities. Just because they’ve had [inaudible 00:35:09] sales, it doesn’t mean that you’re going to be going door to door and selling something. And the other great thing too I think that I learned from being an English major, and going to West Chester I think it’s sitting down and writing papers, and seeing the paper through and turning it takes a lot of grit. We know what it’s like to have to compose a 12 page paper, especially if you wait until the last minute and get a good grade on it.

No other major how to do that. No offense to business major, but they’re not sitting up all night writing a 12 page paper. So anything that you guys choose you’re going to have that work ethic behind you that I think a lot of other majors don’t necessarily have. And I think that’s a selling point in any interview that you go. You should bring that up, “I was an English major. It takes a lot of work. It’s a lot of hard work and I’ve been able to perfect my communication skills.” That’s my advice piece, and lastly I actually came out here today because I was coordinating with Dr Buckelew, Dr Shelvin and we are starting up an internship program at the company that I work with.

And because I’ve done a [inaudible 00:36:19] charge in that, so if any of you guys have questions or are looking for internships at this point, I’d be more than happy to sit down with you and talk to you about what it looks in detail. I think that’s it. That wasn’t 10 minutes.

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

So much of the world these days is seen in different ways, but [inaudible 00:36:45]. Likely I didn’t say that I would like business either and long before I came, I worked for a lot of different things but I worked for six years for a political and market research, and I had for me a lot of really great clients like National Women’s Political Caucus, and Physicians for Social Responsibility. And I’d love to sell, to promote writing. We have lots of time for questions and answers. You all now have to answer the questions, that’s your role and these folks here are going to supply the answers.

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

Thank you sir.

Mike

I have somewhere interest [inaudible 00:37:45] for a startup.

Chris

What’s your name?

Mike

Chris

Thanks for your question Mike. My cousin in or my other cousin found in Europe, so that got me thinking like going on a backpack and [inaudible 00:38:11]. Then it was like how would I stay there and make money? My [inaudible 00:38:22] my other cousin instead, how do you do it? And then he had a friend who stayed there and married a Spanish women, so Spain so he’s [inaudible 00:38:33] I call, there was some other character networking. [inaudible 00:38:39] to just ask for little help and then he [inaudible 00:38:42]. I lose, anyone who wants my ticket and I literally … This was like just as the internet was coming on. I had no phone. I went into the phone book, got [inaudible 00:38:57] to the city, got turned down.

Like 50 schools [inaudible 00:39:04] the guy who my cousin worked for and end up tutoring. I got tutoring all these kids at home. I was all over Spain. I was planning on having my girlfriend meet me there. I already had it planned, then I realized [inaudible 00:39:29] and she became my wife. I realized I couldn’t get enough infrastructure over there, so I was like, “I’ve got to come home.” Firstly I was really pissed and upset. I came back, moved to Maine with my girlfriend. Spent some time up there, [inaudible 00:39:50] approach me, save enough money and then went with her to Venezuela. Thought I did every six months turned out it was only three months.

It was insane and [inaudible 00:40:04], but you just kept trying it. So networking the teacher here at Nelson he said they have another person down there, they can call connections. That’s why it’s so important to actually get our contact information and get everybody’s contact information, [inaudible 00:40:24]. Everything I’ve ever done is by networking and it’s husbanding resources, to create enough of a rock to be able to step.

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

We’ve got a lot of students that go on to teaching [inaudible 00:40:47]. I did contact him, because somebody else was interested in going over to Korea after she graduates this semester matter. I got in touch with him and I said, “I’m not sure if you’re still in Korea. I have a really [inaudible 00:41:01].” Even in sales you’ve got … You’ve gotten a job in sales I think [inaudible 00:41:09]. Again just like you were saying Chris, he did not have experience in that area going through teaching. And so there are ways and just networking.

Female

I’m actually looking for a part-time job right now while I’m trying to find an online school, because [inaudible 00:41:44]. Is there any suggestions of what kind of job I can look for now or [inaudible 00:42:01]?

Coleen Collins

Yeah…

Chris

There’s a lot of remote companies or there’s a lot of companies [inaudible 00:42:46], you could just reach out and say, “Do you have the need for a part time writer? Just ask every single company that that [inaudible 00:43:04], because I could use that content creation for marketing. It’s like, do you know how to interview somebody and just [inaudible 00:43:16]. You could do that and whatever. It’s like every [inaudible 00:43:23], then you can travel and not worry about finding jobs here, there and wherever.

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

Yeah, we had another hand here.

Male

[inaudible 00:43:49] I just had 2,000 followers. Now, I’m just wondering if you had any advice like or marketing yourself, or [inaudible 00:44:18] creativity to something that we could do long term.

Chris

Yeah, I [inaudible 00:44:23]. I think I started a blog maybe 10 years ago and I just did … I wanted to be a public [inaudible 00:44:37]. If you do try to jump out of a job over here into a new industry, how do you do it? You exit that one? No, some writing some coded thoughts [inaudible 00:44:49], “I want to be a tennis reporter or something.” [inaudible 00:44:53] write about it. No one’s going to pay you, but it’s out there. I did blogs.

I called out the [inaudible 00:45:00]. That was like 10 years ago and it still shows up in a search. When people finding by [inaudible 00:45:06] things that I’ve written and so you need [inaudible 00:45:10].

Coleen Collins

[inaudible 00:45:22] upside of that in terms of marketing with any profession, it’s just tell everyone what you’re doing. Share with your friends and family. Give them a [inaudible 00:45:32] there. They would love to help you and especially if you’re involved, they want to see you come to fruition and do everything that you dreamed off. You’re telling us, you’re telling everyone in this room, tell us [inaudible 00:45:46] where to find you on Instagram.

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

We had somebody here a couple years ago, who had graduated through the discussion and he got his first job in [inaudible 00:46:25]. He was working there in the morning, when everybody was [inaudible 00:46:33] and he’s talk everybody up and so [inaudible 00:46:39]. They knew that he was looking for something and that just set him off, and he went [inaudible 00:46:52]. You have these different things and I think that’s good. Christina let me ask, when you were mentioning the internships, do you have a certain media opportunity, and I would [inaudible 00:47:06]?

Christina

Yes. We’re a small company. There’s only about I think 12 of us maybe, and none of us are very good at using social media. I only 26 and I just can’t navigate it, so that’s [inaudible 00:47:23]. The thing and in any profession, and any of you guys can speak to this. Employers want to hire someone creative, and the more you can demonstrate your creativity and your ability to think outside the box, the better off you’re going to be. I think obviously you’re doing that now, you hold your experience during an interview if you want to.
Again, it’s leaving that trail and practicing and you’re going to get in somewhere. The more you talk to people, the more you learn about different professions, the more you put yourself out there, you definitely will.

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

And I will also say, if you use social media without … If you did, you want to have your own personal account, that’s fine. You can use it to market Facebook plus, you can use it for … There are a lot of ways here I think would be university to gain the skill without saying, “I am just here doing your own creative work and that’s it,” but there are other opportunities to see how twitter develops markets, and anybody … [inaudible 00:48:26] you have to have not academic [inaudible 00:48:29]. But in other kinds of publishing, one in the first things they want to ask you is how many volumes [inaudible 00:48:37], how many followers you have on Twitter? You think of [inaudible 00:48:40], there is a lot.
So keep while using that companies or publishers so just using it for the [inaudible 00:48:50], but it is a big part of our lives today. And that’s another perhaps what you were saying to, that your marketing goes around as … We can use it for different ways.

Chris

Who’s taking a class [inaudible 00:49:06]? Anyone? Which other class [inaudible 00:49:11], anybody?

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

It hasn’t [inaudible 00:49:14] in a couple of years.

Chris

Okay, so he’s [inaudible 00:49:18]?

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

I think it’s come back.

Chris

So he’s a published author?

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

Yeah.

Male

And literally [inaudible 00:49:33]. Let somebody else do it if you can’t do it. If you’re not going to promote yourself, then that’s insane. It’s free marketing and the [inaudible 00:49:47].

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

Yeah, Alex.

Alex

This is something [inaudible 00:49:56]. Do you think that acts as [inaudible 00:50:15]?

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

If you…

Alex

Anyone.

Female

Personally I think you have to be careful what you’re doing in education [inaudible 00:50:35] all of a sudden you’re an alcoholic. We know what social media does. I think in fact [inaudible 00:50:44], your clients don’t really want to know, start to think about you … I think [inaudible 00:50:54] is very personal. I don’t think that anything is wrong with sharing. There’s things on there but I think that you have to be the judge of what eventually you want to put out to the world, and whether or not it reached your package well.

Chris

I would be a little bit concerned … I don’t know it’s case by case basis, but if I saw something disturbing, how can I not be in touch with [inaudible 00:51:21]. But at some point in life you have to say, “I don’t give a shit other people. I’m going that way I never backing up a little that way.” So you have the 42 or the financial support to be able to not care, and I think that’s something that this whole discussion is oriented, about getting jobs that [inaudible 00:51:50]. I think now … I know now more than ever you can piece together a decent amount of income, and just be solo or work a couple of people. I started the side hustle 12 years ago, when my wife told me that she wasn’t going back to work. I said, “I don’t know how I’m going to afford this.”

So I started doing stuff at night and then I turned it into [inaudible 00:52:21]. Now for the past five years [inaudible 00:52:23]. It’s scary and I’m responsible for other people, but I just said I’m wearing the same clothes every day, like on the weekend my kids come down and still going, “Are you going to work?” I’m like, “No, [inaudible 00:52:35].” So if that’s the goal, you could get there pretty quickly, because I think it sucks to not show the world exactly what [inaudible 00:52:52].

Chris

There’s some programs I know … I don’t know if you do anymore [inaudible 00:53:20]. But I really think if you volunteer the experience it’s not a profession that’s regulated by [inaudible 00:53:33]. So you can get in and get the experience and you’ll develop. I thought of it as [inaudible 00:53:39] and I think I have traveled a different way, but I do like immigrants. I like helping people that want to … I don’t know there’s just something about that and that desire to fit in, to get part of the American story that’s becoming. If you do it oversees, you’re giving back to people’s lives. Maybe there’s a certificate out there I don’t know, but I try it because you have to kind of like it. And it depends on what you’re doing … I imagine work in Asia for almost … What’s the word? Non Anglo … What’s the … [inaudible 00:54:28].

Christina

…I graduated with an English education degree and I thought about teaching overseas, if I didn’t find something here and I ended up finding something. I get emails all the time. There are so many organizations that you can go through that will mentor you, through the whole process and walk you through it. I would honestly start by doing some research and start talking to people.

Christina

I can [inaudible 00:55:11] all the names on the top of my head.

Female

There’s some actual teaching abroad on our [inaudible 00:55:17] for English majors.

Chris

Go to LinkedIn do exactly what you want to do and just be ready and…

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

I don’t know how she did this, but I had a friend was a [inaudible 00:56:52] for the House of Commons in Britain. She’d got an internship there for a year and she wrote for one [inaudible 00:57:02], she had been an English major. There are a lot of things you can do even after you graduate sometimes with some of these. And some of these things they evolve as you go on, and you might think you have a nice, find more intimate firm that you’re working for rather than [inaudible 00:57:26]. And maybe one day [inaudible 00:57:29], I think with a lot of course work that you can do afterwards, with software or with different things like that, you can take advantage of things here Gen Ed and minors and double majors.

But you can also I’m thinking Colleen when you talk yourself in design to do [inaudible 00:57:57]. She just said, “Okay, I’m just going to learn in design. We have this,” and it became top skill for her. I think what you were saying now, the power of critical [inaudible 00:58:10]. You might as well take forces that that are going to make you better and challenge you, because different skills, learning, picking up software, picking up this, I think majors sometimes worry about that too much. I think that there are other ways to pick that of that is ultimately a little more useful, because you’re going to miss even people that we’re desperate to get out of here, they’ll come back and be, “I really miss [inaudible 00:58:42].” They just know that [inaudible 00:58:51]. Yeah.

Male

So it sounds like you’re saying, if you want to do something right [inaudible 00:59:02], you want to have something to show off to prove you can actually write. And I was wondering what kind of platforms there are there that’s respected, and what’s seen as professional? Is there [inaudible 00:59:12]?

Coleen

I think the best thing is to create your portfolio. It doesn’t have to be any special programming in these words, but really when … Adobe Creative’s recently [inaudible 00:59:31]. You’re going to want to present the work in an insight. Like [inaudible 00:59:51] you print a copy pout and have [inaudible 00:59:59]. Not only did you do the work, but you took the time to present it and [inaudible 01:00:11] just a resume.

Christina

I don’t have the knowledge behind the software part but I look at hundreds of resumes a day, and if you have something that you want to show off, trying to create a link for it and put that link on your resume. People put their LinkedIn profile on the resume. Anything that you can do to go above and beyond and put yourself above the other people, put it on your resume.

Female

I will also say too, I would not underestimate your cover letter. I have a lot of friends and it bothered me, they sent to say [inaudible 01:00:48] every job that they applied too. That’s crazy. There must a refine for this. That same job at every company which is by the way they’re possible, they’re all different so your cover letter is your opportunity to shine and as an English, as a writer it’s really your opportunity to shine. Your resume does all the talking, doesn’t [inaudible 01:01:08]. Your resume does all the talking, but do you know why I shouldn’t call you, because your cover letter is phenomenal. It I really stood out in a way that your resume looks just like the person next to it.
I would definitely emphasize that your cover better really is your marketing tool, and it’s the thing that’s separating you from the person next to follow.

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

I think exactly, the resume is doing all the talking. The talking the cover letter should create an [inaudible 01:01:38] that outlines your ideal. You want the reader of that letter to envision you into the position, or be worth coming in. It changes a list of things or I can do this. You have to talk about the air, and I have to handcraft a story about how you fit in to that firm or that job or that position, and show you’re really worthy of it, show that you know something about the company.

Chris

…on the digital side, I would say I’m not really interested in your resume. I want to see a piece of writing that might be about the domain that the company is working on. Just make something up. Preferably you need the passion to share your opinion and right a couple paragraphs. Or coherent piece of statements followed by paragraphs that demonstrates … It’s all about the performance. One of my best … My best employees [inaudible 01:02:48] was a guy who was working at [inaudible 01:02:51]. He was a regular [inaudible 01:02:53]. He went to a couple of classes at a local community college, and he came away days like, “I don’t know what’s going on here, but I want to work here.” So I made him an intern then he comes up on a code.

Then he quit and I was really upset that he quit, because he got a great job and then he suddenly ants to move to California. He got a job there and then he invested in crypto, made a lot of money then he just got back [inaudible 01:03:17]. But it’s about what can you do? It’s just like yesterday, right? I don’t care about anything else because day one I want you to come in and do that. Make [inaudible 01:03:33]. If I don’t see evidence that you can actually do what you’re telling me you can do, I’m not going to have you in. You’ve got to be some [inaudible 01:03:45]. Pretend that you’re a reporter, anything, just fake it. Put something out there.

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

As if when you’re looking for a job that deals with things like that … We’ve talked there’s some for internships and they have provided examples. If they look at the website, what would they want and show that you can produce and put your own spin on what they want?

Female

How worried would you say things grad school are when comes to jobs like publisher or marketing or anything like that? Would you value intern, like internships and work experience, when they’ve got degrees from grad school?

Coleen

…but for publishing [inaudible 01:04:42]. Unless you get your feet into the water, it’s really the experience. You [inaudible 01:04:45]. You can go to school and get another degree without having been in the field, so that for the publishing company you can start as an assistant, and you could easily work your way up to the top of your publisher or a director I just by just putting the time in. I haven’t seen where a masters is needed, especially [inaudible 01:05:01] such as thee. You’re using skills every day and learning while you’re at the job, and you can switch from company to company, jump the ladder. It’s not like you have the same one forever.

I think it’s nice to have [inaudible 01:05:14], you have a reason why to have passion on something, and you’d like to gain your skill or hide your skill. I don’t think that is necessary to have a progressive career.

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

I think it’s a very bad idea to go when you graduate … If you know you want to go to law school, you know what you want to do. We have people that knew exactly what they wanted to do, when they were sure of it. But if you’re just like, “I don’t feel like finding a job.” you don’t articulate that way but that’s [inaudible 01:05:49]. Two or three years later you’re in the same set, except here it might be more … And people say, “Oh they’re a lot [inaudible 01:05:59]. They’re masters.” I think for certain … If you know you want to go into certain things that you need accreditation, some type of different [inaudible 01:06:11] … of course there are exceptions.

I’m afraid there’s a lot of says she’s here, but I’ve seen a lot of people here and they had a professional degree, but I’ve seen so many [inaudible 01:06:23] done so well, and never going on for their masters. Reason in a company and done everything else or going to a business for themselves. It’s only when you’re in a certain kind of accountant, nursing, doctors, lawyers you need at profession and of course and you know you’re going to do that.

Chris

Remember Ben Franklin had a newspaper when he was 14, so why to take a normal adult 27 years to find himself? It’s like step back and say, “Let me just start questioning now.” I have an 11 year old and a three year old, but I try never to talk about college. I have zero expectation that she needs to go or wants to go. I think she should take … I want her to learn [inaudible 01:07:14], to learn how to code or do something like a side hustle so they can hustle some, so they don’t have to feel like they need to go somewhere and then there’s freedom to choose. I feel like we have it backwards in America.

Dr. Eleanor F. Shevlin

I think we’re going to need to take a little break and then do … But I think it’s also in college for a long time the history of college wasn’t professional, wasn’t to get a job. It was it to give a better personal life and a more fulfilled life, and to tap your talents and develop them. And it’s sometimes looked at as old fashioned especially … I think it’s worth it for those reasons, to be exposed to ideas. We feel it’s because skills are open. You’re not going to go into a company and say, “Hey, I’m going to … I was great at chess, I was great at writing [inaudible 01:08:10] writing,” where you might say a little bit about that. But there are a lot of things that you’re gaining that you put articulate, you could translate in a transferable web. 296 [inaudible 01:08:24], you’re not going to talk to anybody without that.

But you might say, “I’m very adept at dealing with extremely difficult [inaudible 01:08:34], and translating them in a way to make definite outcomes.” That’s what you’re going to be [inaudible 01:08:42]. Let’s take that 10 minutes and then will do some speed networking but before we do that let’s [inaudible 01:08:48].

Days it took to add each additional $1m in ARR from 0 to 10. Will publish 10 - 20 in a few weeks hopefully 😝

Weaken Consumer Bureau, Its Chief Requests... He has called for the bureau to be more “humble” and less aggressive in its efforts to protect consumers and to consider the impact on businesses when making decisions. https://t.co/nBKSAoK51O

Thanks everybody who tweeted, emailed and called their customer service. And thanks @MakitaTools for listening.

I rarely feel excluded from making/building as a woman. But this video from @MakitaTools really did it.

https://t.co/GOtiwoTmk3

#HappyEaster to @arangodb one of my favorite #database platforms

Play the #ArangoDB Easter Egg Hunt at https://t.co/BGuyG0pzfp

Pick a number 1-12 contact the company next to that #

Top Laura Ingraham Advertisers
1. @sleepnumber
2. @ATT
3. Nutrish
4. @Allstate & @esurance
5. @Bayer
6. @RocketMortgage Mortgage
7. @LibertyMutual
8. @Arbys
9. @TripAdvisor
10. @Nestle
11. @hulu
12. @Wayfair

There was 355 people entering 190 ideas in the 2018 Business Idea Competition! Semifinalists to follow.... #business #entrepreneurs

6th grade Ss @WesttownSchool are learning to program in Python using physical computing w/ @Raspberry_Pi & the Sense Hat. #coding #picademy

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Good Writers, Good Readers, Good Publications

Do you read "the paper" (or just read?) just so you can bump into mind-altering articles? To have your perceptions and values tested? To grow the vitality of your mind? Here's an article that makes me appreciate liberal arts -- the major and/or the orientation: What...

read more

I Have Been In the Revenge Business So Long…

I Have Been In the Revenge Business So Long…

Great quote from The Princess Bride. Inigo (Mandi) says it’s not the most famous one… “I have been in the revenge business so long, now that it’s over I don’t know what to do with the rest of my life…”

Days it took to add each additional $1m in ARR from 0 to 10. Will publish 10 - 20 in a few weeks hopefully 😝

Weaken Consumer Bureau, Its Chief Requests... He has called for the bureau to be more “humble” and less aggressive in its efforts to protect consumers and to consider the impact on businesses when making decisions. https://t.co/nBKSAoK51O

Thanks everybody who tweeted, emailed and called their customer service. And thanks @MakitaTools for listening.

I rarely feel excluded from making/building as a woman. But this video from @MakitaTools really did it.

https://t.co/GOtiwoTmk3

#HappyEaster to @arangodb one of my favorite #database platforms

Play the #ArangoDB Easter Egg Hunt at https://t.co/BGuyG0pzfp

Pick a number 1-12 contact the company next to that #

Top Laura Ingraham Advertisers
1. @sleepnumber
2. @ATT
3. Nutrish
4. @Allstate & @esurance
5. @Bayer
6. @RocketMortgage Mortgage
7. @LibertyMutual
8. @Arbys
9. @TripAdvisor
10. @Nestle
11. @hulu
12. @Wayfair

There was 355 people entering 190 ideas in the 2018 Business Idea Competition! Semifinalists to follow.... #business #entrepreneurs

6th grade Ss @WesttownSchool are learning to program in Python using physical computing w/ @Raspberry_Pi & the Sense Hat. #coding #picademy

Load More...

Read Some More

Good Writers, Good Readers, Good Publications

Do you read "the paper" (or just read?) just so you can bump into mind-altering articles? To have your perceptions and values tested? To grow the vitality of your mind? Here's an article that makes me appreciate liberal arts -- the major and/or the orientation: What...

read more

You Don’t Need My Autograph If You Needed It I’d Give It To You

You Don’t Need My Autograph If You Needed It I’d Give It To You

Days it took to add each additional $1m in ARR from 0 to 10. Will publish 10 - 20 in a few weeks hopefully 😝

Weaken Consumer Bureau, Its Chief Requests... He has called for the bureau to be more “humble” and less aggressive in its efforts to protect consumers and to consider the impact on businesses when making decisions. https://t.co/nBKSAoK51O

Thanks everybody who tweeted, emailed and called their customer service. And thanks @MakitaTools for listening.

I rarely feel excluded from making/building as a woman. But this video from @MakitaTools really did it.

https://t.co/GOtiwoTmk3

#HappyEaster to @arangodb one of my favorite #database platforms

Play the #ArangoDB Easter Egg Hunt at https://t.co/BGuyG0pzfp

Pick a number 1-12 contact the company next to that #

Top Laura Ingraham Advertisers
1. @sleepnumber
2. @ATT
3. Nutrish
4. @Allstate & @esurance
5. @Bayer
6. @RocketMortgage Mortgage
7. @LibertyMutual
8. @Arbys
9. @TripAdvisor
10. @Nestle
11. @hulu
12. @Wayfair

There was 355 people entering 190 ideas in the 2018 Business Idea Competition! Semifinalists to follow.... #business #entrepreneurs

6th grade Ss @WesttownSchool are learning to program in Python using physical computing w/ @Raspberry_Pi & the Sense Hat. #coding #picademy

Load More...

Read Some More

Good Writers, Good Readers, Good Publications

Do you read "the paper" (or just read?) just so you can bump into mind-altering articles? To have your perceptions and values tested? To grow the vitality of your mind? Here's an article that makes me appreciate liberal arts -- the major and/or the orientation: What...

read more

Kubrick: So I Find That Reading At Random — That Seems Like the Best Approach

Kubrick: So I Find That Reading At Random — That Seems Like the Best Approach

“I don’t find any systematic way of reading. it’s a terrifying prospect to realize all the books around the world that you’re never going to read, what you should read. So i find that reading at random — that seems like the best approach.”

Because They Were Able To Use Free Libraries Built by Others

Because They Were Able To Use Free Libraries Built by Others

Here’s a succinct description of open source software and its benefits. It’s from Roads and Bridges: The Unseen Labor Behind Our Digital Infrastructure from the Ford Foundation.

Free software makes it exponentially cheaper and easier to build software.

Uber, a transportation service, recently announced that some developers had built a way to request cars through Slack, a team collaboration app, instead of using Uber’s own mobile app. The project was completed in 48 hours by a team of developers at App Academy, a coding school.

Uber noted that the team was able to get the project done quickly because they “implemented open libraries such as rails, geocoder, and unicorn [sic] to speed up development and build on a solid foundation.” In other words, the amount of coding that the team had to do themselves was greatly reduced because they were able to use free libraries built by others.

One of Philly’s “15 Most Daring Entrepreneurs”

One of Philly’s “15 Most Daring Entrepreneurs”

The word “entrepreneur” is overused. Hackneyed. Trite.

But what other word is there?

My definition is somewhere around here: an entrepreneur is someone who can create new energy and then guide that energy to a beneficial, outsized outcome. At some level, however, he/she is an artist — which I generally define as this: someone who can reorganize reality into a novel state which impacts those who see it or interact or experience it.

Definitions sometimes are the problem. Seeing, knowing, doing, sharing — action takes you closer to the definition.

I’ll just share this tidbit and say thanks Main Line Today for the exposure of what we’ve been doing at Walnut St. Labs!

Part innovation center, part work-space and part auditorium, Walnut St. Labs is a regional epicenter of tech entrepreneurialism. It hosts networking events, brainstorming sessions, and talks from the region’s most successful tech entrepreneurs. “We created an ecosystem, the purpose of which is to build and generate ideas,” says founder and CEO Chris Dima.

That wasn’t Dima’s goal when he got to Walnut St. Labs in 2013. Then, it was just shared office space. Dima was working for Economy.com while expanding his own software-development and marketing company when the lease expired. Five other entrepreneurs worked in the building. “No one wanted to, so I signed the lease myself,” says Dima. “I created a logo and hung a piece of paper on the front door with tape. Walnut St. Labs was born. Lesson learned: You can wait for other people to lead, or lead yourself.”

Grants from the Chester County Economic Development Council helped Dima transform the former taxi garage into an innovation center. “You need a clubhouse where like-minded people can gather,” he says.

In early 2016, Dima moved Walnut Street Labs to a new space—still in West Chester and with the same vibe. “I want to nurture tech entrepreneurship in the suburbs—and Chester County, specifically,” he says. “That’s who I am, and that’s the story I want to tell.”

Good Writers, Good Readers, Good Publications

Good Writers, Good Readers, Good Publications

Do you read “the paper” (or just read?) just so you can bump into mind-altering articles? To have your perceptions and values tested? To grow the vitality of your mind?

Here’s an article that makes me appreciate liberal arts — the major and/or the orientation:

What Does a Parrot Know About PTSD?
An unexpected bond between damaged birds and traumatized veterans could reveal surprising insights into animal intelligence.

Here’s an excerpt:

Nearing Serenity Park’s exit, I decided to turn back and step inside Cashew’s quarters for a moment. I had only to nestle close to her perch and she immediately hopped on my back. Crisscrossing my shoulders as I had watched her do with Lilly Love, she stopped at one point for what I assumed would be the parrot equivalent of a kiss. Instead, she began to clean my teeth: her beak lightly tapping against my enamel, the faint vibrations strangely soothing. Immediately afterward, she took a brief nap in my shirt’s left breast pocket — it felt as if I’d grown another heart — then re-emerged and crawled to the top of my head. She strolled about there for a time before plucking out one of her own deep blue-green feathers and then descending to gently place it on my left shoulder. I have it still.

Papers were (are?) great because they were multi-disciplinary: the different sections speaking to different audiences and serving different function.

MongoDB Gets Sleuthed by SlamData CTO John De Goes

MongoDB Gets Sleuthed by SlamData CTO John De Goes

From the “holy cow” section of the stands… Follow John De Goes Twitter feed for updates… evidently MongoDB is using PostgreSQL to power its BI Connector.

“Postgres foreign data wrappers support barely any pushdown,” I stated matter-of-factly. “This is all the more true in the Multicorn wrapper you’re using for the BI connector, which is based on an older Postgres and doesn’t even support the full pushdown capabilities of the Postgres FDW.”

Ron admitted defeat. “That’s true,” he said.

I pushed him to defend the decision. But he had no answer. I told him to pull the stop cord right now, before MongoDB released the “BI connector”. When Ron shrugged off that possibility, I told him the whole thing was going to blow up in his face. “You might be right,” he said, “But I have bigger things to worry about right now,” possibly referring to the upcoming 3.2 release.

 


And check out his slideshare:

Rodney Mullen Explains Skateboarding Like No One Else Has Ever Explained It

Rodney Mullen Explains Skateboarding Like No One Else Has Ever Explained It

Are You Walking Down the Street Naked?

Are You Walking Down the Street Naked?

This makes sense to me.

“The moment that you feel that, just possibly, you’re walking down the street naked, exposing too much of your heart and your mind and what exists on the inside, showing too much of yourself. That’s the moment you may be starting to get it right.”

– Neil Gaiman, graphic novelist

Failures of Kindness

Failures of Kindness

The inimitable George Saunders delivering words of wisdom and provocation at Syracuse’s 2013 commencement:

“What I regret most in my life are failures of kindness.

Those moments when another human being was there, in front of me, suffering, and I responded…sensibly.  Reservedly.  Mildly.

Or, to look at it from the other end of the telescope:  Who, in your life, do you remember most fondly, with the most undeniable feelings of warmth?

Those who were kindest to you, I bet.

It’s a little facile, maybe, and certainly hard to implement, but I’d say, as a goal in life, you could do worse than: Try to be kinder.”

Man. For some reason that gives me goose bumps.

Read the whole thing and feel something new — perhaps. 

 

 

 

Days it took to add each additional $1m in ARR from 0 to 10. Will publish 10 - 20 in a few weeks hopefully 😝

Weaken Consumer Bureau, Its Chief Requests... He has called for the bureau to be more “humble” and less aggressive in its efforts to protect consumers and to consider the impact on businesses when making decisions. https://t.co/nBKSAoK51O

Thanks everybody who tweeted, emailed and called their customer service. And thanks @MakitaTools for listening.

I rarely feel excluded from making/building as a woman. But this video from @MakitaTools really did it.

https://t.co/GOtiwoTmk3

#HappyEaster to @arangodb one of my favorite #database platforms

Play the #ArangoDB Easter Egg Hunt at https://t.co/BGuyG0pzfp

Pick a number 1-12 contact the company next to that #

Top Laura Ingraham Advertisers
1. @sleepnumber
2. @ATT
3. Nutrish
4. @Allstate & @esurance
5. @Bayer
6. @RocketMortgage Mortgage
7. @LibertyMutual
8. @Arbys
9. @TripAdvisor
10. @Nestle
11. @hulu
12. @Wayfair

There was 355 people entering 190 ideas in the 2018 Business Idea Competition! Semifinalists to follow.... #business #entrepreneurs

6th grade Ss @WesttownSchool are learning to program in Python using physical computing w/ @Raspberry_Pi & the Sense Hat. #coding #picademy

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